3rd time’s the charm

Or so the saying goes.  I’ve made Champagne Pear soap three times now with varying degrees of success as it tends to accelerate trace and can easily become soap-on-a-stick or as we like to call it SOS.  I believe the worst run of this one I had was the one in which I tried using pureed pears.  That was awful.  Just awful.  Disaster doesn’t begin to cover it.  It accelerated to an impossible to work with texture and density that concrete would envy.  The scent all but disappeared because of the heat generated by the inclusion of the pears and the sugars they naturally had.  I still shake my head in shame over that one, but well, it was a lesson learned.  It was a lesson well-learned, too!  No food in the soap.  Maybe someday I’ll try pureed aloe or cucumbers, but no more pears.

This batch was made using the same fragrance oil from Fragrance Laboratory, Orchard Pear, which you really need to smell to believe.  You can practically feel the juice dribbling down your chin and the scent is just – oh my – breathtaking!  So realistic!  LOVE IT TOO MUCH!  If you’ve ever opened up a jar of fresh canned or jarred pears in their own syrup, then you know what it smells like.

I used the regular amount of water, no discount, though the lye was discounted a bit.  About 6%.  The usual additives were also included- coconut milk, Tussah silk, colloidal oatmeal.  I used the following products and have included links to their sites:

Celery and Enchanted Forest mica colours from Mad Oils.

From TKB Trading I used Passion Orange and Pearl Basics micas,

plus a glitter from them called Champagne glitter.  I also used a bit of the Mermaid Collection glitter mixed with the Champagne glitter in a bit of the oil from the soap batch to do a top swirl.

The champagne glitter alone just didn’t grab me the way I wanted it to, so I mixed in some of the Gold from the Mermaid collection from TKB as well and that worked very well alongside the champagne colour.

The oils were a nice mix of mostly soft ones, though they firm up to make a nice hard bar over a standard cure time of about 4 weeks.  I used the following:

1)  Olive Oil, light golden

2) Sweet Almond Oil

3) Coconut Oil, 76 °

4) Avocado Oil

5) Pumpkin Seed Oil

I’ve used this blend before with excellent results.  It yields a nice, firm bar that holds onto the fragrance very well, is easy to blend and work with without the soap firming up too quickly unless it’s due to the FO causing it to accelerate.  And it moisturizes to beat the band!  I love a moisturizing bar of soap.  One that doesn’t make me feel like I can’t get to a bottle of lotion fast enough.  Soap shouldn’t make you feel dried out, stripped and tight.  It should just leave you feeling clean.  Maybe even a bit softer than before.  That’s always nice, too, but to cleanse with some nice, creamy densely packed bubbles that work into a generous rich lather, now that’s the one thing I always shoot for in our bars.  I go for the higher number in the moisturizing.  Bubbles are nice, sure, but they aren’t the lead singer in my band.  It’s all in how the soap makes my skin feel afterwards that matters most.  That number that says it’s a moisturizing bar  is what I aim for every time unless it’s a specialty bar for oily faces.  That’s a different issue altogether.

So how did this batch turn out?  Here’s a hint:

Champagne Pear September 2014 Ready Oct. 13 2014
Champagne Pear September 2014
Ready Oct. 13 2014

So why post on a soap batch I’ve done before?  The swirl inside is a bit new to me and since this batch accelerated so much, I’ not sure it’ll turn out at all, though I did try to whip it into submission numerous times, but not with the stick blender.  That would have made matters worse.  Still the top is also different and I  hope you can see that golden swirl on these images.  I’ll include a few more below in hopes that you can see the colours better.  Meantime, we’ll wait for this one to come out of the mold and be cut in a day or two.  When it is, I’ll update.  IMG_1958 (768x1024)

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